Adventure Sports – The Harsh Reality

My husband and I love to play in the outdoors – snow or shine.  And although we have had many amazing adventures over the past few years, the numerous avalanche fatalities, hiking accidents, and animal attacks this year have been a constant reminder of the inherent dangers of backcountry adventures.

So although I am no expert on ‘adventure safety’ here are some things I keep in mind in hopes of ensuring safe homecomings after any outdoor play date. It shows that we know what we’re talking about when it comes to Adventure Sports – The Harsh Reality.

Invest in good equipment – My husband is a serious gear-head.  If you have a question on outdoor or technical gear he is your man.  And like true technology early-adaptors (not the people that just want to have the new i-Toy just because it’s new and “cool”) his love of gear stems from a passion to see innovation developed with a purpose.

How does this new piece of equipment make my life easier and/or how does it make my adventures safer? When you plan your outdoor adventures. do your research on your equipment and make good investments based on features such as durability and safety.  If it looks good – consider it a bonus, not your primary purchasing point.

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Why Taking Nature Hikes Through The City Inspires Creativity

I love combining two or three unlike things into one experience. When you see the world through one lens, it’s harder to feel inspired by it. Or discover creative solutions for it. Let’s say you work in an office and manage spreadsheets and projects. Do you:

  • Simply follow along with routine and ignoring the fact that no one is communicating with each other.
  • Pretend like you don’t notice the server where the project files are is a mess and everyone loses 15% of their day looking for stuff.
  • Never create a one-sheet of how the project was completed and how it relates to your other projects thus providing insight and future time-saving methods.
  • Don’t bother learning to learn how to speak in the creative language the designers use versus the more technical nature the interactive team uses.

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What Would You Create If It Was Your Last Day?

I’ve been wondering why I even want to create anyway. Aside from the fact, it won’t leave me alone at night and it consumes me. Why else? I love it. It’s fun. It’s interesting. But why else? What’s beneath the surface?

Over the years, I ’ve learned I keep setting goals and cresting the mountaintop of those goals only to find I haven’t reached my goal at all. Instead, there’s a dense jungle with jangled footing and a hazy mist. Why am I here? What am I looking for? I

was in the office kitchen staring blankly at the teas when it struck me that creativity is so important to me because I want to see the world in a different way. A better way.

I don’t want to see it full of thick unease, glazed expression, lack of fulfillment, void of color, and strewn with pain. I want to see vivid, sparkling evidence that we’re all in control of our own destinies. That we can design our life any way we want.

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Rock Climbing – A Beginners Memoir

One of my great early summer adventures. On a hot muggy June evening, I set out with three other members of Prince George Alpine Club towards Giscome. The rock face we intended to climb was by the side of the road, across from Eaglet lake which lay shimmering invitingly in the heat of the quiet evening.

As we left the city behind I relaxed. The sounds of nature became audible, the swish of wheat in a field, lake water lapping onto the rocky shore and the chattering of birds in the trees.

Just watch this amazing video for rock climbing beginners:

Because Barb and I were beginners we decided to skip the lower rock face and instead climb a few hundred meters up the rocky cliff to a second rock face. Weighed down with long, thick climbing ropes, harnesses, helmets, drinking water and snacks, we were glad to find ropes, someone had thoughtfully left behind, which we hung onto to haul ourselves up against the steep incline.

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Why airlines have trouble turning profit

Q: Why does it cost so much to operate an airline?

A: Moving hundreds of airplanes, tens of thousands of employees and hundreds of thousands of passengers around a vast service network — safely — is one of the world’s most complicated processes.

Think of it as an assembly line in which thousands of pieces must come together at precisely the right time. And each product produced — a trip by an individual — is unique. Altogether, there are about 700 million of those products each year.

The assembly line tools — airplanes, airports and support facilities — are expensive. On top of all that, the assembly line is subject to bad weather, mechanical failures, passenger emergencies in flight, even hijackings, all beyond the operator’s control.

It’s a wonder that fares aren’t far more expensive and that more than 82% of flights operate on time.

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